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What if you had to invest 50 percent of your assets within 50 miles of where you live?

Such questions-at the heart of slow money-represent the first steps on our path to a new economy. Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money presents an essential new strategy for investing in local food systems and introduces a group of fiduciary activists who are exploring what should come after industrial finance and industrial agriculture.

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Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money

Theirs is a vision for investing that puts soil fertility into return-on-investment calculations and serves people and place as much at it serves industry sectors and markets. Leading the charge is Woody Tasch-whose decades of work as a venture capitalist, foundation treasurer, and entrepreneur now shed new light on a truer, more beautiful, more prudent kind of fiduciary responsibility. He offers an alternative vision to the dusty old industrial concepts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries when dollars, and the businesses they financed, lost their connection to place; slow money, on the other hand, is firmly rooted in the new economic, social, and environmental realities of the 21st century.

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money is a call to action for designing capital markets built around not extraction and consumption but preservation and restoration. Sign in. Could there ever be an alternative stock exchange dedicated to slow, small, and local? Could a million American families get their food from CSAs? What if you had to invest 50 percent of your assets within 50 miles of where you live? Such questions-at the heart of slow money-represent the first steps on our path to a new economy. Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money presents an essential new strategy for investing in local food systems and introduces a group of fiduciary activists who are exploring what should come after industrial finance and industrial agriculture.

Theirs is a vision for investing that puts soil fertility into return-on-investment calculations and serves people and place as much at it serves industry sectors and markets. Leading the charge is Woody Tasch-whose decades of work as a venture capitalist, foundation treasurer, and entrepreneur now shed new light on a truer, more beautiful, more prudent kind of fiduciary responsibility. He offers an alternative vision to the dusty old industrial concepts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries when dollars, and the businesses they financed, lost their connection to place; slow money, on the other hand, is firmly rooted in the new economic, social, and environmental realities of the 21st century.

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money is a call to action for designing capital markets built around not extraction and consumption but preservation and restoration. Is it a movement or is it an investment strategy? Thinking in Systems. Donella Meadows. Sacred Economics. Charles Eisenstein. Jorgen Randers. The Great Disruption. Paul Gilding. Natural Capitalism.

Hunter Lovins. The Ecology of Commerce Revised Edition. Paul Hawken. How to Permaculture Your Urban Lifestyle. Bob Waldrop. True Wealth. Juliet B. The Philosophy of Sustainable Design. Jason F. The Green Collar Economy. Van Jones. Michael Brower. Fred Magdoff. Owning Our Future. Marjorie Kelly.

Be the Solution. Michael Strong. The Wealth of Nature. John Michael Greer. Ecotechnic Future. Most Good, Least Harm. Zoe Weil. Toward Sustainable Communities.


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What Comes After Money? Daniel Pinchbeck. Richard Heinberg. Buddhist Economics. Clair Brown. Fleeing Vesuvius. Richard Douthwaite and Gillian Fallon. Transformational Thought. Future Scenarios. David Holmgren.

Slow Money: Investing Because Food, Farms and Fertility Matter

Ellen LaConte. Simple Prosperity.

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David Wann. The Essential Agrarian Reader. Norman Wirzba. Climate Capitalism. What We Leave Behind.

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Derrick Jensen. Fifty Million Farmers. Why Corporation ? Pavan Sukhdev.

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If we use money like manure, we may have a chance to create an economy built on lasting, healthy relationships. We may create a new breed of investors who refuse to accept unnatural returns. To facilitate this paradigm shift, last year Tasch established a nongovernmental organization, called Slow Money, specifically designed to get investment capital flowing to small food entrepreneurs.

But the goal is not just to reconstitute local food systems worn away by industrial agriculture, but more significantly to create a new type of economy by tapping into the tens of thousands of small food enterprises — including family farms, niche organic brands and Slow Food restaurants. Tasch likens the economic meltdown to a person lying in the middle of the street bleeding.

But that's different from figuring out why the patient wasn't healthy in the first place. For Tasch, the crisis is a twofold problem. The first involves getting through the initial collapse, by whatever means necessary.

Slow Money: Investing as if Food, Farms, and Fertility Matter with Woody Tasch

However, it's the second and more challenging one, which involves evaluating and ultimately addressing the inherent structural problems, with which Slow Money is concerned. He's quick to admit that the downturn has left some investors risk averse and unwilling to embrace new ideas. However, during his six months speaking around the country, Tasch senses what he calls a "strong latent demand" for alternatives. Because food is obviously extremely tangible, people understand that nurturing diversified agriculture has so many social, environmental, health and even national security benefits think food security which work across so many different levels including job creation," he said.

But following internal discussions and public talks, it became clear to Tasch that making structural fixes in the economy was at odds with the old VC model.